Japanese Gardens: To whom do they belong?

Ishibashi Lecture Series
Saturday 12 Mar 2016 | 1.30 - 4.30 PM (Doors open at 1 PM)

Kyoto University of Art and Design. Room J41
Jikishinkan, Uryuyama Campus
2-116 Uryuyama Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku
Kyoto 606-8271
JAPAN

simultaneous translation provided

Professor Toshio Watanabe
University of East Anglia (Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures)

Professor Wybe Kuitert
Graduate School of Environmental Studies of the Seoul National University, Korea

Professor Amasaki Hiromasa
Kyoto University of Art and Design

Programme

Lecture 1 | 1.40-2.30pm
How the West Interacted with Japanese Gardens
Professor Toshio Watanabe
University of East Anglia (Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures)
University of the Arts London (TrAIN Research Centre)

Lecture 2 | 2.30-3.20pm
Japanese Gardens and the Beauty of Nature
Professor Wybe Kuitert
Graduate School of Environmental Studies of the Seoul National University, Korea
Kyoto University of Art and Design

Break | 3.20-3.35pm

Panel Discussion | 3.35-4.30pm
Moderator
Professor Amasaki Hiromasa
Kyoto University of Art and Design
Research Center for Japanese Garden Art and Historical Heritage

Watch the video

This series bring together senior scholars from Europe and Japan to explore the contemporary meaning of Japanese gardens in an international perspective.

Japanese gardens are deeply rooted in the intimate relationship between man and nature. Japanese gardens can be found throughout the world and provide space for joy and comfort. Since when, though, did the appeal of these gardens extend beyond Japan and to the States, Australia, Asia and even to Eastern and Central Europe? This lecture series explores the popularity and progress of Japanese gardens found outside of Japan.


Third Ishibashi Foundation Lecture Series: Lecture 1 ‘How the West Interacted with Japanese Gardens’ Professor Toshio Watanabe (The recording of the lecture starts at 09:40)


Third Ishibashi Foundation Lecture Series: Lecture 2 ‘Japanese Gardens and the Beauty of Nature’ Professor Wybe Kuitert


Third Ishibashi Foundation Lecture Series: Panel Discussion (in Japanese)

About the Speakers

Professor Toshio Watanabe
University of East Anglia (Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures)
University of the Arts London (TrAIN Research Centre)

Toshio Watanabe is a researcher and university professor based in England since 1977, shortly after completing his doctorate at the University of Basel, Switzerland. He founded the Research Centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN) at the University of Arts London in 2004. Key publications include Ruskin in Japan 1890-1940: Nature for Art, Art for Life (Gen. Ed.), Koriyama City Museum of Art, 1997. (Winner of 1998 Japan Festival Prize and of 1999 Gesner Gold Award). He is currently Vice-President of Comité International d’Histoire de l’Art (CIHA) Bureau and a member of the Advisory Board for Tate Research Centre: Asia-Pacific.

Professor Wybe Kuitert
Graduate School of Environmental Studies of the Seoul National University, Korea
Kyoto University of Art and Design

Wybe Kuitert is a researcher, designer, writer, and university professor, with a focus on Japanese gardens with a special interest in scenery, landscape gardening, cultural history, environmental design and landscape design. After his studies in the Netherlands (Wageningen University) and Japan (Kyoto University), Kuitert worked in Japanese and European universities and institutions. Besides his academic work, he is the principal of Wybe Kuitert Landscapes BNT. Key Japanese gardens designed by Kuitert include Keukenhof Japanese cherry garden and the Von Siebold Memorial Garden at the Hotus Botanicus Leiden, a botanical garden affiliated with the University of Leiden. He has written extensively on Japanese gardens. Titles include Gardens and Landscapes in Japan: 1650-1950 (University of Pennsylvania Press, forthcoming, Summer 2016), Themes in the History of Japanese Garden Art (Hawai’i University Press, 2002), and Niwa zukuri no kokoro to jissen (co-edited volumne, Kadokawa Shoten, 1999).

Professor Amasaki Hiromasa
Kyoto University of Art and Design
Director, Research Center for Japanese Garden Art and Historical Heritage

Amasaki Hiromasa studied landscape garden after graduating from Kyoto University. He has designed a number of gardens including the Japanese Garden of the Kyoto State Guest House while lending his research expertise in Japanese garden to teach cultural heritage garden preservation and management. Key publications include Ueji no Niwa (Ed., Tankosha, 1990), Chatei no Shikumi (Tankosha, 2002), Amasaki Hiromasa Sakuteishū (Tankosha, 2006), and Ogawa Jihee VII (Minerva shobo, 2012). He has won a number of awards including the Japanese Institute of Landscape Architecture Award (1992), Kyoto Prefecture Culture Prize for Distinguished Services (2007), Park and Open Space Association of Japan Kimura Award (2010), and the Academic Society of Japanese Garden Award (2011).

Poster

Information

Admission to the event is free. Seats will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis (380 places available).

For more information, contact:
Email: k.nishioka@sainsbury-institute.org
Tel: +44 (0)1603-597510 | Fax: +44 (0)1603-625011

Sponsored by the Ishibashi Foundation http://www.ishibashi-foundation.or.jp/english/
Organised by the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures http://sainsbury-institute.org
With support from Kyoto University of Art and Design http://www.jghh.jp

Image: Japanese garden in the Norwich Cathdral

 

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