Japanese Porcelain Today, Future Directions and Past References


11月15日2012年 | 6 pm

Norwich Cathedral Hostry (Weston Room), Norwich NR1 4EH.

Nicole Coolidge Rousmaniere

Nicole Coolidge Rousmaniere
Research Director, Sainsbury Institute
Curator, The British Museum


Hare and Moon. Dish (1690-1730). Porcelain with underglazed cobalt blue design. ©The Trustees of the British Museum.Franks.1292+

Hare and Moon. Dish (1690-1730). Porcelain with underglazed cobalt blue design.
©The Trustees of the British Museum.Franks.1292+

Every Third Thursday of the month, the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures hosts a lecture on a topic related to the art and culture of Japan. Talks begin at 6pm (50-minute lecture followed by refreshments). Speakers are all specialists in their field and the talks are intended to be accessible to those with no prior knowledge of Japanese history.

Admission is free and all are welcome. Booking essential.

To book a seat email us at [email protected] or fax 01603 625011 up to two days before the lecture stating your name, number of seats required and a contact number. Unless indicated otherwise the lectures are held at the Norwich Cathedral Hostry (Weston Room), Norwich NR1 4EH. The Third Thursday Lecture series is funded by the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation and the Robert and Lisa Sainsbury Charitable Trust.

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About the Lecture

With the four-hundredth anniversary rapidly approaching, now is a particularly opportune occasion to re-examine the history of Japanese porcelain from a modern angle. This four hundred year retrospective of the evolution of Japanese porcelain affords multiple new interpretations. Many questions have long remained unanswered. For example, why did Japan only begin to produce porcelain for the first time around 1610, centuries after both China and Korea had mastered the technique? How, given its late start, was Japanese porcelain able to be exported throughout Asia, the Middle East and Europe by the 1660s to such high acclaim? Competition between kilns for market share both within Japan and abroad was rife. Not withstanding intrigues, government and trade restrictions as well as changing consumer tastes, Japanese porcelain has continued to flourish these 400 years adapting to market demand and to the latest styles. Today, porcelain production in Japan continues unabated both in traditional centres and by ceramic artists creating powerful modern expressions in new areas. Professor Rousmaniere in this series of three lectures uncovers the history of Japanese porcelain from its complicated birth through its strong export period to its powerful contemporary presence. Recent archaeological and art historical data are introduced to create a revitalised picture of the industry as a whole. New light will also be shed on the significant Japanese ceramics in the British Museum created by pioneering collector Augustus Wollaston Franks, first curator and then Keeper at the British Museum from 1851-1896.